DOREEN GRANT – A REFLECTION

Sunday, November 3rd, 2019

Cats’ Aid sadly lost one of our longest-serving members, Doreen Grant, last February. This tribute is written by Ann Woulfe, another of our Core Group members. Cats’ Aid extends our sincere sympathy to Doreen’s daughter, Lesley. Ed.

A smiling face and twinkling eyes are what I vividly remember about meeting Doreen for the first time. That was in March 2004 at Pat Keating’s vet practice in Raheny. We clicked immediately and thus began a great friendship. One year later I was handing the proceeds of a fundraiser over to Doreen when she said, “Do you fancy doing one or two nights on the Helpline?”

Doreen was our “go to” person within Cats’ Aid for many years and her home became an indoor haven for rescued cats. When I first met her she had up to thirty cats dependent on her. She was for many a “last gasp saloon!” She loved each and every cat that came into her care and she tried to give each of them individual attention every day. Her shopping list/bill was all about wet food, dry food, cold meats etc. all for the cats. She mourned the passing of each cat she lost. She was a private person re: grieving but did appreciate support when she received it.

Doreen had many other interests which had been sacrificed along the way for the sake of the cats. However, she did enjoy the company of other people and she would smile when I would say “You scrub up well,” when we went out for lunch.

She was an acute observer of human nature and was very shrewd in her dealings with others. Although she was no fool, she was instantly sympathetic if someone shared with her a loss or difficulty they were encountering in their daily lives. She would spend hours on the phone every day, starting with the Helpline. She provided an informal counselling service (for us.)

Doreen didn’t drive and giving her a lift to or from meetings proved to be a mixed blessing. She would have the agenda in front of her (in the car) and would proceed to air her thoughts on the various items. By the time we would get to the Hall she would have herself completely wound up and would walk into the Hall saying “I’m going to have to go; I have thirty odd cats to feed.” We would try to appease her by saying “Ah, stay a while; you’re just here.” I never knew whether to burst out laughing or to say a silent prayer .

After the very sad passing of Doreen’s son, Hugh, a few years ago, Doreen’s health started to bother her more. She tried valiantly not to complain, and she became a true warrior in terms of keeping going for everybody’s sake. Life had become very difficult. She was able to continue living at home and passed away suddenly but peacefully in February of this year . . .

We still remember all the cats and kittens she took into her home and heart.

GONE, BUT NOT FORGOTTEN.